hudebnik: (Default)
A number of our favorite early-music recording artists (e.g. Ciaramella, Ex Umbris) have recently been slumming in the 17th century, playing ornamentation or improvisation over grounds such as Chaconne, La Folia, Passamezzo (of whatever age), etc. So after listening to some of these on CD this evening, I went to Home Depot looking for late-night cup-hooks and sand, still whistling variations on the Chaconne, and suddenly over the loudspeaker come the first notes of... "Bodyguard".
hudebnik: (Default)
Well, a mommy staircase and a daddy staircase love one another very much, and...
hudebnik: (Default)
President Obama took years after entering the White House to publish a paper in a refereed academic journal.

President Trump seems to be on his way after only two weeks, with an illuminating example of the Alternative Facts approach to mathematical proof.
hudebnik: (Default)
Somehow I got onto whitehouse.gov's e-mail list, and my first e-mail from the Trump administration asks me to sign a petition supporting Justice Gorsuch's nomination to the Supreme Court.

The e-mail includes this bit: "Judge Neil Gorsuch follows the same principled approach espoused by Justice Scalia. He carefully applies the statuary text and he follows the Constitution’s original meaning."

Seriously -- "statuary text"? I've heard of people viewing the law as an edifice, or as graven in stone, or as fixed and unmoving, but not literally as a statue.
hudebnik: (devil duck)
The teenaged female tomboy protagonist decided for some reason that a particular physical-fitness video game was her route to social acceptance. Determined to get really good at the game, she asked around on social media for exercises and challenges, and somebody suggested "for each level, pick a target number of points, and try to get as close to that number of points as possible, neither over nor under."

This is so 21st-century: rather than work hard to get actually physically fit, she works hard to get good at a video game about physical fitness.
hudebnik: (devil duck)
"The laws are set now on abortion and that's the way they're going to remain until they're changed."

NY Times
hudebnik: (devil duck)
Following up on David Friedman's post...

The Paris attacks left us all concerned about a similar terrorist attack happening to us, and wondering what we can do to prevent it. Let's look at the data. Almost all the attackers in the Paris attacks were either French or Belgian citizens, so we should certainly regard French and Belgian citizens trying to enter this country with extra scrutiny. And of the terrorist attacks that have actually taken place on U.S. soil, the vast majority were committed by U.S. citizens, so we should be especially cautious about allowing U.S. citizens to enter the U.S.

In fact, to be really safe we should kick everybody out of the country and only allow them back in one at a time after a thorough individual background check. Who will conduct this background check, I'm not sure....
hudebnik: (rant)

From the New York Times:

Robert L. Livingston resigned in scandal in 1998 just days before he was set to take over the House speakership. Now, as a prominent Washington lobbyist, he said he was advising [new majority whip] Mr. Scalise on policy and leadership issues.
“He doesn’t ask for it,” Mr. Livingston said of his advice. “I volunteer it.”

Such selflessness! Who ever heard of a Washington lobbyist volunteering his advice, free of charge, to a Congressional leader? That's the kind of civic-mindedness that America needs more of.

hudebnik: (devil duck)
We're all familiar with "'Scuse me while I kiss this guy," "There's a bathroom on the right," "You're a mahogany tree, babe," and the like.  This morning on our favorite folkie-singer-songwriter station was a song with a country-western vibe whose chorus tag-line seemed to be "She's a mixed up meshugginah girl".  On further listening, I concluded it was really "She's a mixed up, mixed up sugar girl," which actually makes LESS sense than the mis-heard version.
hudebnik: (devil duck)
aibohphobia, n. fear of palindromes
hudebnik: (Default)
Should I be concerned that the New York City Department of Finance is headquartered in Newark, NJ?
hudebnik: (rant)
see this post comparing Rick Santorum's policies with those of a radical leftist agitator named Jesus.
hudebnik: (teacher-mode)
My local NPR station did a program on the end of the world tomorrow, and end-of-the-world movements in general. The host pointed out that Revelations is quite specific about the number of people to be saved: 140,000. I'm not sure whether that's drawn from the currently living, or from the entire history of humanity, but let's assume the former. There are something like 7 billion people on Earth, so approximately one in 50,000 of them will be saved. For example, that's about 160 people in New York City. Who would notice?

Which raises the disturbing possibility that Mr. Camping could actually be right, and the remaining 99.998% of us would never know. Not to mention the even more disturbing possibility that he was actually right the first time around, in 1994; the rest of us slept through both the Rapture and Judgment Day, and we're already started on the Millennium without noticing.

What if they gave an apocalypse, and nobody came?
hudebnik: (Default)
"You know, if you go to Manhasset shopping and you want a bris there, you have to go to the Miracle Moyle."


Keep yer day job, dude....
hudebnik: (Default)
Got a bill from a health insurance company. The procedure cost $50, our co-pay is $20, and the insurance company paid 37 cents. (The provider presumably eats the remaining $29.63.)

Why would any company bother paying 37 cents for anything? The labor to process the claim has to cost more than that.

Profile

hudebnik: (Default)
hudebnik

September 2017

S M T W T F S
     12
3456789
10 111213141516
171819 20212223
24252627282930

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Sep. 22nd, 2017 06:20 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios